Indoor Pastures. Double Your Herd While Everyone Else is Selling Cheap!

What if you could raise feed for your animals without the risk of weather and crop failures?

Move Your Pasture Indoors: Eliminate Drought, Snow or Overgrazing Conditions

SRF-Biscuit-2015  Produce from 25 pounds to 20,000 pounds + of green grass sprouts daily for your cattle, horses, sheep, goats, chickens, turkeys, rabbits, alpacas, llamas, deer, etc. inside the comfort of a shed regardless of your local weather or climate conditions.  1 unit replaces 200 acres+ of pasture. Units can be indoor systems or outdoor trailer types.

25 pounds of fresh sprouts will feed 1 beef cow or 1 horse or 4 – 8 hogs or 222 to 370 chickens or 83 to 138 rabbits daily. The amount of sprouts needed depends upon the type, size, condition, and activity of the livestock and also whether it is being used as the primary feed or with other feeds, such as hay or straw, used as a supplement.

Very easy to operate – just add seeds and water. Seeding to harvest takes just 7 – 8 days. This provides fresh Spring Season grass sprouts all year round. Experienced growers are spending less than 1 hour of labor per ton of fresh sprouts harvested.

Customers have found that even feeding just a small quantity of sprouts daily has been beneficial for their livestock, so there is a leeway on what needs to be fed.  This can vary depending upon availability and cost of the grains vs hay.

You can picture the mats looking like the sod that you would put on a new lawn but without any dirt attached at all.  You can adjust the amount of grain sprouted so you won’t have any waste green grass each day.  The livestock eat the entire biscuit, roots and all with relish.

 

Customers have told us that their livestock come running when they see the sprout wagon or trailer coming.  They like the fresh green grass as much as it is beneficial for them.  Some customers have purchased these units specifically to provide feed for older or sick livestock.  The fresh soft grass is easier for the livestock to eat and digest than eating grain or dusty dry feed.

 

We normally recommend Barley simply because it seems to have the most nutritional value of any of the grain sprouts but you can use alfalfa, oats, wheat, triticale, ryegrass, buckwheat, field peas, clover, sunflowers, etc.  Simply adapt your sprouts to the most economical and nutritional grains available.  

You should also start slowly by providing only small quantities of the freshSRF-Sprouts-Horses3 sprouts daily until your livestock become accustomed to the new feed.  Then increase the amount slowly until feeding the full mat.  You can even mix grains to provide your livestock with a nutritional salad mix

1 pound of grain at approximately 40% nutritional value becomes 8 pounds of sprouts at approximately 90% nutritional value.  The tender, moist, easily digestible and highly nutritious green grass is better for livestock than grain and hay.  

Note:  I’ve seen studies which try to compare the dry weight nutritional value of sprouts vs the dry weight of traditional grains, etc.  The process of sprouting eliminates the enzyme inhibitor that’s present in all grains to protect the grain from contamination before sprouting.  It also changes the starch present into more easily digested components.

Growing sprouts uses up to 99% less land, 98% less water, & 50% less energy than conventional farming practices, all while reducing transportation costs in feed.

 

These systems are a variation of the original sprouter system developed in Australia over 20 years ago so the manufacturers have a great deal of experience with this product.  We frequently get inquiries from potential customers who have tried to build their own sprouting systems and have dismally failed due to cost and extensive mold problems. 

Dwight McBride

info@hydroponicsfarming.com

http://www.hydroponicsfarming.com

http://shop.hydroponicsfarming.com/Sprouters_c38.htm

704-933-6105

Rabbit raising Part 1 homesteading, survival, survivalist, peak oil, long term food storage


Don’t know what youtube has changed in the uploading process but this is the SIXTH try in uploading this video. Been at it for nearly a full DAY…… Part 1 of our new series on raising rabbits looks at equipment needed for rabbit raising as well as helpful hints in getting started. This series has been in the works for six months as we have tried to capture video of kits at various ages and stages of growth. This new series is about raising rabbits for MEAT, ie, to EAT. Be forewarned that we will discuss rabbit raising in that format and later videos will show some butchering – with a warning before it actually comes up. So for the PETA crowd, men of the other gender and the “we won’t eat anything with eyes” crowd, you’ll probably want to skip these videos. www.survivalreport.net www.homesteadingandsurvival.com Be sure to visit and support our sponsor- www.jrhenterprises.com 17 years in the preparedness and survival business.