Custom Sidecar

Custom built sidecar

redneck_sidecar

Here you have some custom ingenuity! Determined not to let his girlfriend to up the beverage holder he put on the back of his motorcycle, he built a custom sidecar. It appears to be made of wood and a bicycle wheel. Let us not forget to mention the sweet “one size fits all” 70’s lawn chair. What is really amazing is the fact that he had enough forsight to mount a spare!

Square Foot Gardening

You basically fill 8 inches deep, 3 different ingredients evenly. Those ingredients are 1 part vermiculite, 1 part peat moss, and 1 part compost. If you have to buy compost, I hear mushroom compost is the best. We could not find any, so we just used regular compost. Once they are in the container, stir it around to they are all evenly mixed and start planting!

We recently took this up. We wanted to garden, but due to our recent move late in the year, it needed to be quick. When we moved in we found some old shelves laying out back. We flipped them over and started with those! So our square foot gardening boxes cost us $0!!! Now that is a great start! Unfortunately we only had two, so that left us about 12 square ft. So we will see how it goes.

You basically fill 8 inches deep, 3 different ingredients evenly. Those ingredients are 1 part vermiculite, 1 part peat moss, and 1 part compost. If you have to buy compost, I hear mushroom compost is the best. We could not find any, so we just used regular compost.  Once they are in the container, stir it around to they are all evenly mixed and start planting!

Book shelves Pouring Vermiculite Pouring Compost Samanta Helping Square foot garden Square foot garden

Now if you want to give it a try, I really suggest you buy the book HERE! Its super easy, and great family fun.

Redneck Yacht

Redneck yacht club. Member 001
Redneck yacht club. Member 001

I thought I would start a new category. As I search the web for homestead ideas, I keep running by some of the funniest projects ever! So Ill post them up from time to time. This is a totally awesome project. Scamp travel trailer with 2 story view. Huge AC unit to keep the place like an icebox. Seems to be a fairly sturdy ladder. Very smart idea using truck tool boxes that second as bench seats for anyone brave enough to board with ya. Im sure one of them seconds as an icechest as well, of course. As least he thought things through and place a hand rail on the second level!

Hay Bale Gardening

Hay Bale Gardening
Hay Bale Gardening

Now this is one interesting article. We are square foot gardening, and in searching for more literature, I ran into this article. It spawned all kinds of ideas, so I thought I would share.

Gardening with No Back Pain! Hay Bale Garden

Author: Stacy Pessoney

Have you ever heard of growing your garden on bales of hay? Well, if you are interested, it is not very hard and has a lot of advantages over the traditional garden, especially if you do not want to do a lot of bending over, tilling and digging. Hay bale gardens are also great for growing a garden when you do not have much yard space. People have been known to grow straw gardens on their driveways or even on their rooftops!   To plant a hay bale or straw garden, soak your straw or hay bales in water every day for up to two weeks. Some people simply make a slit in the top of the hay with a spade and insert their plants into the slit, just as if it were dirt.   You can speed up the hay conditioning process by watering for three to four days, then adding a layer of hummus, peat moss, potting soil or compost to the top of the bales. Simply plant your seeds inside and add any plants that you may have started already.   How does it work? Well, hay contains many microorganisms. When they get enough water, they will start eating away at bacteria inside the hay. All of this action makes compost material inside the bale, creating a perfect environment for your plants to grow. Hay bales drain very well, so you never have to worry about too much rain or watering. Make sure that you maintain the moisture level inside the hay bale and you are all set.   You can reuse your hay bale garden next year. After two years of use, you may want to replace the bales. Two-year-old hay bale gardens make wonderful compost for the rest of your yard.   There are a lot of benefits to having a hay bale garden. One, the drainage makes root rot and other soil-borne illnesses a non-issue. Tomatoes especially grow well in these conditions. Because they cannot get too much water, they will have strong roots and the tomatoes will not become grainy, pale or deprived of nutrients.   One of the most enjoyed benefits of the straw garden is the lack of bending over, digging and tilling. Many people love gardening but simply cannot handle the physical labor of caring for the plants. With a hay bale garden, you can make it as high as you need it to avoid the need to bend over. If you stack bales to keep plants within reach, make sure that you stake them to avoid them tipping over.   Another benefit of hay bale gardening is that rabbits cannot climb up to the plants. Furthermore, dogs and other animals will not see your garden as a great place to dig and play.   Taking care of a hay bale garden is so simple that you will wonder why you ever did it any other way. Simply water and you are done. Keep your water hose on a  garden hose reel  to always have it handy. If you are physically challenged, consider an automatic hose reel for super easy watering. Enjoy your hay bale garden!

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/gardening-articles/gardening-with-no-back-pain-hay-bale-garden-931687.html

About the Author:
About the Author:  Stacy Pessoney is an award winning author and writer of web content for many different web sites.  She is well versed in many different areas, including gardening,  hose reel , lawn care and landscaping.

Tin Can Ice Cream

Found this recipe on making Tin Can Ice Cream and thought you guys might enjoy. We sure did!!Yum!

Tin Can Ice CreamFound this recipe on making Tin Can Ice Cream and thought you guys might enjoy. We sure did!!Yum!

Tin-Can Ice Cream

By Juliana Lewis

For this recipe, you will need two sturdy cans with tight-fitting lids. One will need to hold about a quart (liter) and fit inside the other with space all around it. In Steps 1 and 3, secure each lid to its can with duct tape, if available.

3/4 cup milk
1/3 cup sugar
1 cup whipping cream
nuts, fruit in small pieces, and/or your favorite flavoring
crushed ice
rock salt

1. Pour all the ingredients into the smaller can, mix, put the lid on securely, and place this can into the larger one.

2. Pack crushed ice around the small can until it fills the bigger can.

3. Pour at least 3/4 cup of rock salt evenly over the ice, then put the can lid on securely.

4. Roll the can around on a hard surface for at least 10 minutes. (A mild game of keep away might be a fun way of doing this—but be sure the lids stay on tight!)

5. Open the cans, removing the smaller one to make sure no salt or ice gets into it. The mixture should be frozen around the edges. Scrape it away from the sides with a table knife, and mix it into the part that’s still liquid.

6. If it’s well frozen, dig in! If not, reseal the smaller can, put it in the larger can again, pack more ice and salt around it, reseal the larger can, and roll it around a few minutes more. Repeat Steps 5 and 6, if necessary. Serves four.

Credit goes here!